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Product Management

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Product Management Certifications

Product Management Certifications will be of any help in securing a new job in that domain?

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Hey!Product Management courses will get the ball rolling and add weight to your resume, especially if you build up a portfolio as part of your course. However, you need to understand that this sort of role relies more on industry experience (even if just through internships) and the amount of work you have put in. So don't treat this as a course that will open up doors unless you are willing to thug it out in this uber-competitive field. Courses like the Upgrad one can be useful. You can get a discount on the course using this referral code: ACQU199Hope you get your dream job!

answered by Acquilin John

How essential are domain expertise in managing a product?

Image courtesy: Fusion VenturesRecently I asked this question on my LinkedIn feed and yet to get a single reply. I have been pondering over it by myelf for some time. If you recollect the core product management skills preached around, those are hardly specific to a domain or industry.What has been your experience as a contributing product manager, or what have you seen in other product managers around?Like in sales, marketing, or accounting, are product management skills portable across domains and indutrries?Cheers,Ranjit

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Depends on the product and the way teams are set up.For a high-tech product (such as AWS S3 or Storage gateway), a PM normally needs to have domain expertise. But some such companies may choose to define the PM role as a more "enabler and coordinator" role and instead designate a strong tech engineering manager to provide technical inputs to the roadmap.For a B2C product, such as Zomato ordering app for instance, a PM may not have much food industry experience. Understanding consumer pain points and then using data to drive the org goals is more important. Someone from design or even support background might be a good fit for this kind of product management.Coming to the last question - yes many of the PM skills are portable. Understanding customers, building strategies, crunching numbers, making tradeoffs and coordinating and leading teams are pretty much relevant in all kind of companies and industries.

answered by Nikunj Verma

Have you used Net Promotor Score (NPS) and how did you find it?

We recently started using NPS and wrote our experiences here: https://cutshort.io/blog/startup-learnings/myths-around-nps-scoreHave you used NPS before? If yes,What your criteria for sampling users?Did you find NPS valuable?Any challenges or caveats you'd suggest for others?

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What makes someone a great product manager at companies like Myntra, Uber and Ola?

What skills and qualities are required to be a successful PM in a fast growing companies?

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Good question. At such fast growing companies, a PM needs to have different skill sets than those at early stage startups or even big MNCs such as Google.These things come to my mind:Strong business/users understanding: Needs to know not only the users' painpoint and behaviors but also how the product/business actually works to solve their problem. What makes Myntra different from Jabong?Ability to solve new problems - at fast pace: What makes companies such as Myntra and Ola challenging is that everyday there can be unique business challenges. One day you are fighting nation wide supplier strikes, next day you are sued by a user for lack of safety. Your product needs to respond while still keeping your committed deadlines. It's a ruthless battle between changing priorities and a PM needs to be strike the right balance without losing time.Leadership: Needs to rally the team around a common, well defined set of goals. Needs to represent their product/team well in front of all the different stakeholders and perhaps even "fight" them to do what's right. For example - the Product Manager at Myntra should have fought the decision to go "app-only" a few years ago based on their data and insights about the users.Data driven: At such companies, teams are much bigger and there are several teams to coordinate stuff with (such as legal, operations, support and so on). Without clarity on what metrics are important and how they will react to a decision, is important to bring consensus in such environment. As a PM, you often lack official authority. Knowing your numbers gives you that authority.Some early thoughts, as I said. But enough to start your thought processing going!

answered by Nikunj Verma

Which is the best idea to prioritize the features?

When we have more features to build parallelly, we need some metrics to prioritize it.  

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Hi Abhilash, There are different methods for doing this, I will sum up my knowledge and will try to exlain as much as I can with very few words. I will try to list out few points that will definitely help you decide what you are looking for : > Use Ranking System, Rank all the features based on the requirement and user demand> Make Graph With Axis Impact & Effort, Point out all features and you will have super clear list of things which you might considering doing first, what to do next, what should be done later or not to work on it at all.> Considering 2nd point in mind, Think of Feature / Module Dependency over other Features. For Example, If a feature X is having huge impact but with requirement of more Efforts & it will be dependent on Feature Y, You have to consider time & efforts for making Feature Y as well.> List out features according to what problems do they solve and which one is having the highest degree of requirement.> Try to think from the perspective to Build something on A Layer, on which, Later on you can build multiple Layers / Features. And Follow the same, start with the bottom (Main Problem Solution of your product), then work on Next Layer (Additional Features, Features that will add value, User demands etc) and eveything else falls in other layers. Hope this helps :) 

answered by Mayur Patanvadiya

Have you heard of the anti roadmap and how important is it to remove unwanted features?

The usual thinking when preparing a product roadmap assumes that more features = more engagement = more revenue. But is it always true?

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Just the way your "roadmap" says what to build, an "anti roadmap" says what to kill. Read this article: https://www.sequoiacap.com/india/article/anti-product-roadmap/That said, "anti roadmap" is nothing revolutionary. It's just a more fancy name for avoiding feature bloat. Figuring out what features are not moving the needle and getting rid of them has always been an important part of product management.

answered by Nikunj Verma

What would a small startup look for in a "consulting" Product Manager.

Many startups drive for a little too long on passion of the founders and take longer involve Product Management into decision making. Even when the decide to, they may not have the budget to hire a good full time Product Manager. In this situation how feasible is the option of a "consulting" Product Manager and what would a startup look for in him before involving him.

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Well questions can vary from product to product, and it can vary based on the state of the startup at the time they approach a product Manager for consulting. I think they would be interested in knowing answers to following questions & more:1. How can you simplify the existing product flow or add value in the product for the existing customers2. How can you help in customer retention - detailed plan3. How you are going to help us scale the product - detailed plan4. How can we approach the next thing we are planning to build - market fit, gap analysis, customer segmentation, strategy5. How can we increase market penetration/share...

answered by Vijay Dwivedi

If Twitter hires you as the Product Manager for its core product, what would be first 3 things you'd do?

These are tough days for Twitter. Their user growth is stagnant and the effort to turn around things are failing. They can't even find a buyer. What 3 concrete steps would you take to save the product?

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Twitter has been quite successful in getting people onboard.It has been successful in kind of killing long sentences and force people to innovate around the 140* characters limit.It has made conversation possible inplace of lenghty monologues.And ...Its quite successful in , may or may not be intetional, in posing itself as the "dirt repository". (people actually dig out old tweets to prove their point).Now what it has failed in are...Keeping people engaged. It's perfectly fine to be on and off on it. Most of the time you wont miss anything. While Fb kind of makes you feel like missing your life if you are off.Setting new trends. For quite a long time twitter has become "also". They also have emojis. they also have this and that kind of. Nothing of the sort "pioneer".Live. Twitter is the platform for "live dicussion" about events but not for the live events itself.I'd start working on the above 3 issues fright from day one, if hired.

answered by Amol Mujumdar

If you were a Product Manager at Myntra, how would you have handled the proposal to go app-only?

We all know that Myntra's app-only idea didn't work.  But at that time, it must have been a difficult decision. If you had been in that position, how would you have handled the proposal objectively? How would you have managed the stakeholders and what experiments you would have run, with what possible outcomes?

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I dont know who decided for going app-only. But here is my take on it.App only was a bold step knowing that in fashion it's important to offer the best possible view of the goods so the bigger screen, the better would be the "obvious" thing. On the other hand Myntra would definitely have noticed the rate of app adotpion was higher than that of growth on website. So these are 2 "kind of" opposing inputs to the strategy decision.What should the Product Manager have done, was to device some well synchronized experiments get a better insight into this. The experiments could include showing messages on site as "coupon XYZ for 5% extra discount if you buy via app" and vice versa. These kind of experiments would have revealed the possibly similar results without the shock of going app-only and then back to dual mode.If the call was of the PM, equiped with the above data, he'd have taken a much better call.If it was not of him, the above experiment would have helped him put across his point backed with hard data.

answered by Amol Mujumdar

Which product you wish you had done Product Management for?

It could have been a product that you loved but was ruined by the product team. Or perhaps a successful product that you would have enjoyed managing. Or something else? 

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YouTube is a product I would love to manage. It's a product I feel taken for granted considering the recall value it has but on a stand-alone basis it has a lot of issues. From explicit content issues to pathetic 'sort by content ' rankings. Apart from this they have not opened it for external developers to the extent that they should. Considering he engagement and how much customer preferences data it generates it had its own challenges and one could learn a lot from the same I would love to work on it.

answered by Nitin Jain
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