The Modern Recruiter series: Increase your joining ratio with Reverse Interviews!

People not joining after accepting offers.

This has been a big problem shared by the companies and they have been looking at many ways to increase the joining ratio. Many solutions have been thrown around to address this problem – from blacklisting candidates:

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to sending them laptops like Kunal Shah or offering money like Zappos if they drop out earlier in the process;

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However, as you probably might have noticed, my inclination has always been toward solving the root of this problem instead of treating the symptoms. I really think the right solution is to attract the right kind of candidates and create a path for them to trust you and believe that your company is the perfect place for them to work at.

Reverse interviews: one more way to build the trust and understand your candidates.

I recently came across some articles on reverse interviews. Here is what I learned.

What are reverse interviews?

In a reverse interview,  once the company has decided on a final pool of candidates, they provide the finalists the opportunity to meet with current employees in the same role as they would be entering as, with the invitation to interview them. They are told they are free to ask the employees anything that they wish about the company culture, opportunities, management style, work life balance, support, etc.

Why do reverse interviews?

Reverse interviewing is not just about increasing the joining ratio, it can also help you in evaluating the candidate better:

  • Often, candidates drop their ‘interview mask’ and loosen up while speaking with peers. This lets you understand them better.

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  • Listening to and analysing the questions candidates ask can lend relevant insights into what motivates them. Is the candidates asking about opportunities for advancement and taking on additional responsibility? If so, he may be executive material. Is he more concerned about workplace policies such as comp time, dress code, or drug testing? That may be a red flag. Simply asking numerous, pertinent questions may tab a candidate as conscientious and well-prepared.

Additionally, reverse interviews are also great in building trust with the candidates:

  • Let top candidates obtain all the information they need to fairly and accurately evaluate the company and the opportunity.
  • Give the potential new hire an opportunity to forge an early relationship with a current employee.

And finally, reverse interviews also help you improve your hiring process and employer brand

  • By offering reverse interviews, your company stands our from the other companies and looks confident about what you can offer to the candidates.

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  • By exposing the dandidate to successful, enthusiastic employees, they can easily picture themselves in the same winning scenario. The company essentially is trying to get the applicant to “buy” into the firm and its mission. Doesn’t it make sense to use the organization’s best seller to close the deal?
  • If multiple candidates are sharing the same concerns in reverse interviews, your company can address them via its marketing, and branding initiatives.

Finding it interesting but not sure if you should offer reverse interviews?

I understand.

However, this isn’t something new. Smart candidates already do their research before joining your company. They are reading on GlassDoor about your company and reaching out to your current and former employees via LinkedIn.

Why not tackle this problem head on and offer them a chance to talk to your happiest employees? It is bound to help you increase your joining ratio.

What do you think? Would you consider offering reverse interviews to your top candidates before making an offer?

 

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This post is a part of The Modern Recruiter initiative to help hire better in 2020 and beyond. 

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